Australia are on course for victory at the Gabba after being set just 128 by India to win the second Test. Join our over-by-over coverage from the Gabba with Matt Cleary.

Email him at matt.cleary.casual@theguardian.com

Day three – as it happened

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By Russell Jackson (morning), Geoff Lemon (afternoon) and Matt Cleary (evening)

: News

Digital design emailed to zero-gravity printer on International Space Station and used to produce working ratchet

Astronauts on the International Space Station have used a zero-gravity 3D printer to produce a working socket wrench complete with ratchet action – using digital plans that were emailed to the station by Nasa mission control on Earth.

Engineers at Made in Space, which built the experimental printer, overheard space station astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore mention on the radio that he needed a socket wrench. The company used computer-aided design (CAD) to draw up plans, produced an earthbound version of the spanner for safety certification by Nasa, then had the plans relayed to the ISS, where it took four hours to print out the finished product.

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By Guardian staff

: News

Trevor Gibbon to appear in court after Alison Morrison was stabbed to death in Harrow during morning rush hour

A man has been charged with the murder of his neighbour who was stabbed to death as she made her way to work in the morning rush hour, police have said.

Police were called just before 8am on Thursday after witnesses heard screams and 45-year-old mother-of-one Alison Morrison was found with stab wounds. She taken from the site, around a half a mile from her Harrow home, to St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, where she died.

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By Kevin Rawlinson

: News

Despite the impact of a rare protest against clerics, it remains to be seen whether the Pakistani state is willing to channel this anger into reform or action

‘All supporters of the Taliban are bastards,” states a banner strung up in Rahim Yar Khan, attributed to the police of this district in Punjab and posted on Facebook by a police officer. In Islamabad, protesters converged on the Red Mosque, the scene of a brutal confrontation between the Pakistani military and seminary clerics and students in 2007, to demand that the mosque’s head cleric denounce the Pakistani Taliban’s massacre in Peshawar. The Pakistani government has already begun executing convicted militants on death row.

These scenes would have been virtually unimaginable in Pakistan just a few weeks ago. But the massacre of 132 children in a school in Peshawar has served to channel outrage against the state and finally to get Pakistanis to agree that militancy is a problem.

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By Saba Imtiaz in Karachi

: News

Figures show more than 75% of estimated savings will come from women under cuts planned by Tories if they win election

Women will overwhelmingly bear the brunt of a freeze in tax credits and benefits that will be introduced by George Osborne if the Tories win the general election next year, according to an analysis by the House of Commons library.

The shadow chancellor, Ed Balls, accused the Tories of planning to “hit millions of families on modest incomes” after the figures showed 80% of the estimated savings in tax credits would come from women. Women would provide 75% of the savings in benefits.

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By Nicholas Watt, chief political correspondent

: News

If the Sony email hacking was ‘morally treasonous’, what about the shaming of the former Mrs Murdoch?

There has been much astonishment, in the aftermath of the Sony leak, that its principal victims, senior executives would you believe, were foolish enough to write so frankly in workplace emails. “Inappropriate” is a word favoured by the obedient, primmer-sounding type of work emailer, as well as by an apologetic Amy Pascal. What kind of irresponsible idiot, nowadays, does not self-censor? Maybe, after a succession of cautionary events, workplace discretion is more advanced in the UK. Put together, Leveson, the News International hacking cases and internal surveillance at the post-Savile BBC have done much to the discourage the punctilious worker from recording anything in an email, a text or even in a draft, that she wouldn’t mind being used, one day, as a standard text for trainee diplomats.

It may be some consolation for the Sony executives that, however bad things might look, at least the hackers don’t appear to have unearthed any unsent private love letters, like Rebekah Brooks’s legendary draft. Unless that’s why The Interview was finally cancelled. Written for her colleague, Andy Coulson – later, of course, to become a trusted Downing Street employee – the internal News International love letter remains, for some of us, the highlight, out of so many, of the trial of Brooks, and a gloriously instructive advance on her Leveson texts, including “yes he Cam!”, and “Brilliant speech. I cried twice”. And just as the rest of us watched and learned from her folly, it seems a fair guess that Cameron no longer writes lol-suffixed texts about horse-riding, in the old, Chipping Norton patois: “Fast, unpredictable and hard to control but fun.”

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By Catherine Bennett

: News

Prosecutor charges elderly US-based Islamic cleric with operating armed terror group following raids on media outlets

A Turkish court has issued an arrest warrant for the US-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gülen, a former ally of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan who has since become a fierce critic.

In his request for the warrant, Istanbul public prosecutor Hasan Yilmaz accused Gülen of leading a criminal organisation. According to Turkish media reports, the charges include operating an armed terror group, which carries a penalty of up to 15 years in prison. Yilmaz said that “sufficient tangible evidence showing that Gülen committed a crime was collected during the investigation”.

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By Constanze Letsch

: News

The Arsenal manager’s perseverance paid off in the summer when he signed Alexis Sànchez, who could have joined Liverpool

Arsène Wenger has admitted that if things had worked out differently last summer then Alexis Sánchez would have been lining up for Liverpool against Arsenal at Anfield on Sunday.

The Arsenal manager moved decisively while he was in Brazil working as a World Cup TV pundit to close a £30m deal for Sánchez from Barcelona. The Chile forward has been Arsenal’s player of the season so far, scoring 14 goals in all competitions and making light of any settling-in difficulties.

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By David Hytner

: News

28-year-old hands self in to police after street attack that killed Neil Doyle and left two other officers seriously injured

An off-duty PC who was killed in a street assault in Liverpool city centre is believed to have been identified as a police officer by those who attacked him.

PC Neil Doyle, 36, and two other off-duty officers were attacked after leaving a pub in the early hours of Friday morning.

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By Josh Halliday

: News

• Carter: ‘Two beautiful words I’ve been waiting for’
• Carter aiming to get snooker career back on track

Ali Carter has been given the all-clear seven months after he was diagnosed with lung cancer.

The 35-year-old, twice a World Championship runner-up, recovered from testicular cancer last year and is aiming to resume his career.

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By Guardian sport

: News